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New Book from John R. McNeill– Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1640-1914

I am excited to report that my friend and Georgetown colleague, John R. McNeill, has just published his latest book-  Mosquito Empires: Ecology and War in the Greater Caribbean, 1640-1914. Here is a brief description–

This book explores the links among ecology, disease, and international politics in the context of the Greater Caribbean – the landscapes lying between Surinam and the Chesapeake – in the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries. Ecological changes made these landscapes especially suitable for the vector mosquitoes of yellow fever and malaria, and these diseases wrought systematic havoc among armies and would-be settlers. Because yellow fever confers immunity on survivors of the disease, and because malaria confers resistance, these diseases played partisan roles in the struggles for empire and revolution, attacking some populations more severely than others. In particular, yellow fever and malaria attacked newcomers to the region, which helped keep the Spanish Empire Spanish in the face of predatory rivals in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In the late eighteenth and through the nineteenth century, these diseases helped revolutions to succeed by decimating forces sent out from Europe to prevent them.

And here are some reviews from the book jacket:

“For most of the last five centuries, the Atlantic empires – European and North American – wrested, fought wars, and killed thousands of citizens and slaves for possession of the wealth swaying in the fields of the Caribbean islands and coastlines. The dominant factors in the long conflict, no matter what the protagonists claimed, were not political or religious or even economic but septic, that is, the microbes of yellow fever and malaria. J. R. McNeill’s book is by far the clearest, best informed, and scientifically accurate of the accounts available on this sugary conflict.” – Alfred W. Crosby, Professor Emeritus of History, Geography, and American Studies, The University of Texas at Austin

“J. R. McNeill’s new book does more than exhibit his usual gifts – breadth of range, mastery of material, depth of insight, freedom of thought, clarity of expression. It has changed the way I think about empires of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and will challenge many readers’ assumptions about the limits of human agency in shaping great events.” – Felipe Fernandez-Armesto, University of Notre Dame

“In this authoritative and engaging book, J. R. McNeill argues convincingly that disease played a pivotal role in many of the momentous events of Caribbean history. He shows how the region’s disease ecology changed following the advent of European colonization and how this served and then subverted the interests of the Caribbean’s oldest colonial powers. Mosquito Empires is indispensible to any student of Caribbean history or the history of disease.” – Mark Harrison, Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford

“Who would have guessed that the mosquito played such a vital role, shaping the fate of empires and revolutions, in such a vitally important part of the world? This provocative book is an eye-opener, written with great verve and wit.” – Philip Morgan, Johns Hopkins University

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Anthony Clark Arend is Professor of Government and Foreign Service at Georgetown University and the Director of the Master of Science in Foreign Service in the Walsh School of Foreign Service.

Commentary and analysis at the intersection of international law and politics.